York team in Atlanta trading strategy competition


On Thursday 19th April, five York students will take part in the final of a competition in Atlanta, Georgia, where they will present a trading strategy that they have devised over the last few weeks.

Out of over 60 universities worldwide, each were able to submit up to two teams, York was the only British university to enter, and the team of Tom Armstrong (Mathematics), Edward Bottomley (Economics and Finance), Jasmine Gotobed (Economics), Theo Wilson (PPE), and Gabriel Zedda James (Economics and Mathematics), were selected as one of the final five. They are taking part with the chance to win $10,000 (£7,000), for the victorious team.

The York team will have 15 minutes to pitch, and take questions from a panel of judges, all with experience in finance, on the advantages and drawbacks of their chosen strategy.

The team’s underlying philosophy looked at Piotroski’s F-Score concept (a Stanford economist and a concept that their supervisor, Dr. Keith Anderson of York Management School has studied in the past). The concept looks to score companies on 9 different indicators, and if the overall score meets Piotroski’s threshold, then he would buy it for the year.

The York group revised the strategy, modifying the indicators and putting weightings on their preferred components, and bought on a quarterly basis, as opposed to a year, so they had more flexibility in an ever-changing market, and managed to return a much higher amount than Piotroski with their ‘G Score’ strategy, with relatively little risk.

The five students were put together through their membership of the Griff Investment Fund; a group of around 50 undergraduate and postgraduate students that manage £10,000 of the university’s endowment and invest in the stock market. Established in 2013, the group is one of, if not the UK’s first student run, real money portfolio.

The York team would like to thank the Economics department, York Management School and Careers and Placements for their generous support in helping them get fully funded for their trip, and for a great opportunity to showcase some of York’s homegrown talent.

Guest blog written by the competing York team. 10462866_721708444559543_7156964333157593598_n

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Summer’s here and the time is right…


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…for dancing in the streets, maybe, but it’s also a great time for building up your work experience.

It could be a formal, three month internship, a few week’s work experience, a volunteering scheme or some ‘portfolio’ work, spanning a number of different jobs.

It’s all work experience that can help build your CV, your skills and strengths, and your insight into various types of work and sectors. These are the things that can inform your career choices and identify what further information you need to make those future decisions.

If you’ve already got your summer sorted, that’s great, but if not, read on…

Good starting points to find work over the summer, include our web resources and info sheets.

The Look for Work section of our website gives useful jobs sites for internships and part-time/temporary work.

The Internship Bureau works with local employers to create project-based, paid summer internships. Vacancies for these types of opportunities are beginning to be advertised on Careers Gateway, so look out for them under the ‘Exclusive opportunities @York’ tab or make sure you’re receiving our regular emails. You can tick the ‘Placements and Internships’ option on your personal profile in Careers Gateway.

Look out for volunteering opportunities in York (or your home area) for over the summer vac. You can check out www.do-it.org for some ideas in your particular UK location.

Why not also take the chance to develop particular skills or knowledge. It could be through a MOOC (free, online courses), online journals, professional associations’ websites or discussion groups and forums.

Finally, if you’re planning to travel this summer, be sure to record your experience and the skills you develop during the time. You may have gone travelling for the fun and different cultures and food, but you’ll be using some important skills in language, communication, problem solving, social awareness, planning and even possibly resilience!

Remember, whatever your summer involves, everything can count towards your development – so get planning your summer steps.

If you need some further pointers or help with deciding what to do, call into one of our Drop-in Sessions in Careers (Tues – Fri, 11am – 1pm in term-time).

Guest blog: Being a student brand manager for Frontline


 Guest blog written by Rebecca, student Brand Manager for Frontline

Before starting my second year, I was looking for a part time job that I could do alongside my studies. I came across Frontline whilst searching for flexible charity positions. I had begun to think that my search was a little niche –  flexible, salaried positions where you can work in your own time toward a good cause… I hadn’t had much luck until I found Frontline. I had worked with vulnerable young people in the past so I was immediately drawn to the mission of changing the lives of children in the UK through social work. I also wanted to gain experience in PR and marketing so this role was ideal.

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Guest blog: Finding a placement


Guest blog written by Miles Thorp, digital Director at Banana Moon, personalised clothing company

So, the hunt begins. How are you feeling? Overwhelmed? Excited? Stressed? I remember feeling all the above when I was looking for a placement. Feeling like someone slapped me round the face every time I got rejected and oh boy, there were a few rejections. Since then I’ve had the pleasure of seeing the placement process from both sides. Finding and doing a placement and hiring and mentoring placement students. I can’t help but think, if only I knew then what I know now. If I could take all the best bits from the applications I’ve reviewed and the students I’ve worked with, finding a placement would have been a piece of cake! Here are some actionable next steps to help relieve some of your stress.

The why

Why do you want to do a placement? This should be the first question you answer. The reason behind getting a placement will help you decide on the type of company you want to work at and it will also help you plan for the worst-case scenario.

Action 1: Define 3 reasons why you want to do a placement

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Guest blog: How to fast-track your placement year application


Guest blog written by Jessica Murray, Content Creator at Debut

Thinking about applying for a placement year? Wise decision, my friend. A placement year is a sure fire way to build your network, develop some valuable skills and graduate from university with experience that will make you super employable.

But while that’s all well and good, it’s the application that’s the tricky part, right? There’s no denying that some placement roles can be competitive, but don’t let that put you off.

We’ve got loads of top tips for applying (as well as loads of placement year opportunities up for grabs on our app), so why not make 2018 the year you step outside your comfort zone and bag your dream opportunity?

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Avoid those awkward questions this Christmas!


present green Careers blog written by Irena Zientek, Operations Manager: Information & Engagement, Careers and Placements

On Christmas Day, after the turkey has been eaten, the presents have been ripped open and you’re recovering from too much pud, you can slouch into the sofa and breathe a sigh of contentment.

However, the Christmas vacation isn’t all about groaning at Christmas cracker jokes and watching festive celebrity editions of Pointless. It will probably bring you some slightly less seasonal activities too – you might have course work to complete or revision to begin. You may also have to fend off those tricky questions from parents, aunts and uncles. You know the ones – “what are you going to do after you finish at University?”, “have you started applying for jobs?”

Make time this vacation (before Christmas takes over) to take some positive steps, so you can answer those questions with confidence!

Unsure what career is for you?

Start to Get ideas from the web page of the same name! Our Career planning info sheet has lots of exercises and resources to help – you don’t need to look at them all, but there should be something useful for you to try.

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Guest blog: 6 ways to make the most of your final year at university


 Guest blog written by Bridgewater Graduates

Those first few years at the University of York do fly by and before you know it, the all-important final year arrives. Your final year is a tough one filled with harder assignments, dissertations and exams that could have a big impact on your future. On top of all this, you’re probably worrying about what you are going to do next year!

Take a deep breath because final year doesn’t have to be as scary as it seems. To really make the most of it, you should:

Stay focused

You know that this is an important year and if you want to end it with a fantastic degree classification, you’ll have to step it up and stay focused. Final year is more about individual studying and research. You can’t rely on just your lecture notes carrying you through.

The key is to get organised (which is easier said than done for some of us). Say goodbye to the all-nighters and make a plan that gives you plenty of time to hand in your assignments. If you’re organised, you’ll really be able to perform at your best.

Remember, at the end of the year you’ll want an impressive degree grade to show off to potential employers.

Have fun

There’s more to university than studying. The partying doesn’t have to stop in your final year and getting/staying involved in social events, sports clubs (bring on Roses!) and activities is important. Not only are these things fun for you, but employers like to hear about your hobbies and interests on your CV.

Find the balance

Your final year is the perfect time to start practising your work-life balance. Too much partying will have a negative impact on your grades, too much time shut up in the library will leave feeling bored and miserable.

By organising your days and increasing your productivity, you’ll be able to get out and enjoy your evenings.

Tackle the big decisions

There’s no point burying your head in the sand, your time at uni is coming to an end. The big question that every final year has to face is, what’s next?

If you haven’t made a decision yet, it’s time to think about your career options. If you’re struggling to decide what direction you would like to go career-wise or need help getting started, visit your university careers department and have a chat with an advisor. You can also try taking a personality test to see what types of careers suit you.

Find out what employers want

Your degree means that you can apply for graduate jobs, but employers want to see so much more than that. What you’ll need to demonstrate are the transferable skills you’ve developed during your time at university, like the ones on this soft skills list.

To get a better idea of what skills employers are looking for, start browsing some relevant job adverts early. If there are any desirable skills that you need to work on you’ll have time to do it in your final year.

Gain work experience

Your work experience will help you to stand out from the crowd when it’s time to apply for graduate roles. Make an effort to get some relevant work experience now, and you’ll reap the benefits later.

This article was written by Bridgewater Graduates who offer sales, management and a variety of other commercial graduate jobs with market-leading businesses across the UK and Ireland.